For much of the 20th century, American Indian identities were shaped, at least in popular culture and public imaginations, by advertising imagery, Edward Curtis photographs, and wild west shows.  In the past few decades, American Indian artists and filmmakers have extracted their own image from these external forces, challenging the established codes of representation.  The goal of the Gekinoo’amaadiwin Film Series is to challenge its audience through the use of film to examine and discuss the issues of culture, identity and stereotypes of American Indian people.

In the Ojibwe language, Gekinoo'amaadiwin, means 'to learn from the traditional teachings'.  In respect to the oral history and traditional storytelling, gekinoo literally means to learn, and amaadiwin means to seek knowledge from the traditional oral teachings of the culture.  Thus, the Gekinoo'amaadiwin Film Series will examine and discuss the issues of culture, identity and stereotypes of American Indian people through the use of film to challenge it's audience to rethink how indigenous peoples from across the world have been portrayed in film from the last 100 years.

Check out the events page to see the upcoming films featured in the Native American Heritage Month programs in the inaugural Gekinoo'amaadiwin Film Series.